Tissue around tumor holds key to fighting triple negative breast cancer

A natural substance found in the surrounding tissue of a tumor may be a promising weapon to stop triple negative breast cancer from metastasizing. A preclinical study published in PLOS ONE September 19 by Thomas Jefferson University researchers found that decorin, a well-studied protein known to help halt tumor growth, induces a series of tumor …


Scott Waldman Awarded CURE Grant to Move Colon Cancer Test Closer to Commercialization

Scott Waldman, M.D., Ph.D., Chair of the Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics at Thomas Jefferson University, has been awarded a Commonwealth Universal Research Enhancement (CURE) grant for almost $750,000 to help advance a molecular diagnostic test for colon cancer into commercialization. Such a test would better detect recurrence in a group of colon cancer …


Dr. Leonard Gomella, Program Director for IPCC in New York

Leonard G. Gomella, M.D., FACS, Chair of Urology at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital and Director of Clinical Affairs at the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson, will serve as the Program Director for the Fifth Annual Interdisciplinary Prostate Cancer Congress (IPCC) at the New York Marriott East Side in New York City on March 31. This …


Biomarker Links Clinical Outcome with New Model of Lethal Tumor Metabolism

Researchers at the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson have demonstrated for the first time that the metabolic biomarker MCT4 directly links clinical outcomes with a new model of tumor metabolism that has patients “feeding” their cancer cells.  Their findings were published online March 15 in Cell Cycle. To validate the prognostic value of the biomarker, …


Rawls Palmer Progress in Medicine Award Presented to Dr. Scott A. Waldman

Scott A. Waldman, M.D., Ph.D., will receive the American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics (ASCPT) Rawls–Palmer Progress in Medicine Award at the 2012 Annual Meeting on March 16. Established in 1978 by Dr. W. B. Rawls, the award recognizes scientists who have implemented progressive research techniques and tools to improve patient care. ASCPT will …


PCF Young Investigator Award Goes to Jefferson Researcher

Heather Montie, Ph.D., a post-doctoral research fellow in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, has received a Prostate Cancer Foundation Young Investigator Award for her work with androgen receptor (AR) acetylation and its role in castration-resistant prostate cancer. Young Investigator awards are designed to promote long-term careers in the field of prostate cancer by …


Dr. Renato V. Iozzo receives an honorary degree from Semmelweis University in Budapest, Hungary

Congratulations to Renato V. Iozzo, M.D., a Professor of Pathology and Cell Biology, and Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, for receiving an honorary degree (Doctor Honoris Causa) from Semmelweis University in Budapest, Hungary. Dr. Iozzo received this award in November 2011 in recognition for his contributions to the field of Matrix …


Stronger Intestinal Barrier May Prevent Cancer in the Rest of the Body, New Study Suggests

A leaky gut may be the root of some cancers forming in the rest of the body, a new study published online Feb. 21 in PLoS ONE by Thomas Jefferson University researchers suggests. It appears that the hormone receptor guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C)—a previously identified tumor suppressor that exists in the intestinal tract—plays a key …


Taxpayers Give Back for Cancer: Jefferson Researcher Awarded ‘Refunds for Research’ Grant

Takemi Tanaka, Ph.D., of Thomas Jefferson University’s School of Pharmacy and the Kimmel Cancer Center, received a $50,000 grant toward her breast cancer research, as part of the Pennsylvania Breast Cancer Coalition’s (PBCC) “Refunds for Breast and Cervical Cancer Research” initiative. The PBCC’s grants are made possible through contributions from state taxpayers who choose to …


New “Achilles’ Heel” in Breast Cancer: Tumor Cell Mitochondria

Researchers at the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson have identified cancer cell mitochondria as the unsuspecting powerhouse and “Achilles’ heel” of tumor growth, opening up the door for new therapeutic targets in breast cancer and other tumor types. Reporting in the online Dec.1 issue of Cell Cycle, Michael P. Lisanti, M.D., Ph.D., Professor and Chair …


Blocking Receptor in Key Hormone Fires Up Enzyme to Kill Pancreatic Cancer Cells

Pancreatic cancer researchers at Thomas Jefferson University have shown, for the first time, that blocking a receptor of a key hormone in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) reduces cancer cell growth by activating the enzyme AMPK to inhibit fatty acid synthase, the ingredients to support cell division. With that, a new chemopreventive agent that inhibits the …


Leukemia Drug Reverses Tamoxifen-Resistance in Breast Cancer Cells

Taking a leukemia chemotherapy drug may help breast cancer patients who don’t respond to tamoxifen overcome resistance to the widely-used drug, new research from the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson suggests. Interestingly, researchers found that tamoxifen combined with dasatinib, a protein-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, reverses the chemo-resistance caused by cancer-associated fibroblasts in the surrounding tissue by …


KCC Research: Cancer Cells Accelerate Aging & Inflammation in Body to Drive Tumor Growth

Researchers at the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson have shed new light on the longstanding conundrum about what makes a tumor grow—and how to make it stop.  Interestingly, cancer cells accelerate the aging of nearby connective tissue cells to cause inflammation, which ultimately provides “fuel” for the tumor to grow and even metastasize. This revealing …


Highlights from KCC American Cancer Society Research Symposium

The Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson hosted the 3rd Annual American Cancer Society Research Symposium: Celebrating the ACS Institutional Research Grant at KCC on May 6, 2011. Dr. Nevalainen welcomed members of the KCC and TJU community and the American Cancer Society. Richard Pestell, MD, PhD gave the Keynote Address, “Cancer Invasion and Metastasis and …


Jefferson Researchers Unlock Key to Personalized Cancer Medicine Using Tumor Metabolism

Identifying gene mutations in cancer patients to predict clinical outcome has been the cornerstone of cancer research for nearly three decades, but now researchers at the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson have invented a new approach that instead links cancer cell metabolism with poor clinical outcome. This approach can now be applied to virtually any …