Dr. Veronica Rodriguez-Bravo Receives Grant from W.W. Smith Charitable Trust

2
Jan

Headshot of Veronica Rodriguez-BravoVeronica Rodriguez-Bravo, PhD, Assistant Professor of Cancer Biology at Thomas Jefferson University and a member of the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center – Jefferson Health, has been awarded a $135,000 grant for the project titled “Dissecting Targetable DNA Integrity Checkpoints in Prostate Cancer” from the W.W. Smith Charitable Trust.

Rodriguez-Bravo is focused on advanced prostate cancer research. Her basic research is centered on mechanisms that regulate the transfer of molecules in and out of the nucleus through complexes known as nuclear pores. These mechanisms are important for regulating gene expression, and her lab is trying to understand how these processes that support the stability of the genome drive prostate cancer. Understanding these mechanisms can help identify novel targets and develop new therapeutics to treat the disease.

“Dr. Rodriguez-Bravo’s research lays the foundation for understanding how advanced cancers attain aggressive characteristics,” said Karen E. Knudsen, PhD, Enterprise Director of the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center. “It is precisely these types of basic discoveries that pave the way for new therapeutic approaches, and funding from the W.W. Smith Charitable Trust is an essential facilitator toward that goal.”

The W.W. Smith Charitable Trust is a private foundation that awards grants that enable basic medical research in the fields of cancer, heart disease, and AIDS; ensure basic human needs; and supplement higher education scholarships.

The Trust aims to help medical researchers pursue breakthroughs that will immeasurably improve lives by identifying and funding projects from promising basic medical researchers that are unique and meritorious. A medical advisory committee of leading scientific experts reviews the many proposals submitted each year and advises the Trustees as to how to fund those projects that will likely have an immediate and direct influence against disease.