SKCC and Joe Biden Receive Atlas Awards for Leadership in Fight Against Cancer

5
Aug

'We're closer than ever before to understanding what causes cancer,' said Vice President Joe Biden (second from right). On August 3, Dr. Karen Knudsen (left), Director of the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson, and Dr. Klasko (second from left) accepted the World Affairs Council of Philadelphia Atlas Award for Leadership in the Philadelphia Area, while the Vice President was honored for his visionary leadership in the fight against cancer. Jefferson medical oncologist and researcher Edith Mitchell, MD, FACP, is part of a 28-member Blue Ribbon Panel appointed to inform the scientific direction and goals of the Vice President's National Cancer Moonshot Initiative. See the story in Campus News on this page. Photo: David Goldstein

The Vice President received the 2016 Atlas Award; the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center received 2016 Atlas Award for Leadership in the Philadelphia Area. Jefferson medical oncologist Edith Mitchell, MD, FACP, is part of a 28-member Blue Ribbon Panel appointed to inform the scientific direction and goals of the Vice President’s National Cancer Moonshot Initiative.
On August 3 in Center City, the World Affairs Council of Philadelphia presented Vice President Joe Biden with the 2016 Atlas Award, in recognition of his historic and visionary leadership in the fight against cancer. Jefferson was also honored to receive an award for leadership.
“We’re closer than ever before to understanding what causes cancer,” said the Vice President during his acceptance speech.
Jefferson Oncologist Serving on VP’s Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel 
In April, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, announced that the renowned Edith Mitchell, MD, FACP, had been named to a 28-member Blue Ribbon Panel of scientific experts, cancer leaders and patient advocates that will inform the scientific direction and goals at NCI of Vice President Joe Biden’s National Cancer Moonshot Initiative.
Dr. Mitchell, a practicing clinician focusing on colorectal and triple negative breast cancers, is widely known for her work in fighting cancer disparities. She is the current president of the National Medical Association, and, at Jefferson, serves as the Director of the Center to Eliminate Cancer Disparities and Associate Director for Diversity Affairs at the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center.
“It is well recognized that cancer is a leading cause of death and its incidence expected to increase in future decades,” said Dr. Mitchell. “Minorities, especially African Americans, suffer a disproportionate share of the burden of cancer in the United States with higher incidence rates and poorer survival when compared to other racial and ethnic populations. Therefore, “The Moonshot Initiative” may define prevention, diagnostic and interventional strategies leading to cancer healthcare equity.”
To learn more, see the news release issued by the NCI.
Several other media outlets were covering this story including;