KCC Researchers Awarded $480,000 from Breast Cancer Research Foundation

9
Sep

Richard Pestell, MD, PhD and Andrew Quong, PhD

The Breast Cancer Research Foundation recently announced that Dr. Richard Pestell and Dr. Andrew Quong received unanimous approval for studies in breast cancer, the second most prevalent cancer-related cause of death in women in the United States.

Beginning October 1, 2013, Dr. Pestell will receive $240,000 to continue the “Molecular Genetic determinants of Breast Cancer Stem Cells” study and Dr. Quong will receive $240,000 to continue the “Clinical Proteomics for Breast Cancer Diagnostics” study.

Dr. Pestell’s study will focus on basal breast cancer including triple negative breast cancer, defined by the absence of three receptors (estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 [HER2]). Triple negative breast cancer is prominent among African-American women, and currently no targeted therapies for this type of breast cancer exist. Within human breast cancer a subset of cells have characteristics of stem cells (BTIC), which may contribute to recurrence and therapeutic resistance. The mechanism by which the gene DACH1 inhibits BTIC is being determined as a new approach to enhance therapeutic responsiveness. Dr. Pestell’s findings over the last year that DACH1 binds to and enhances function of the p53 tumor suppressor, but fails to bind mutations of p53 identified in human breast cancer, adds further weight to the original hypothesis that DACH1 is a breast tumor suppressor. Dr. Pestell’s studies in 2012-2013 will continue to define the role of endogenous DACH1 as a breast cancer suppressor.

Support from BCRF has also allowed Dr. Quong to complete his studies examining changes in protein levels in breast tumors. From these observed changes, Dr. Quong’s team found changes in the metabolism of tumor cells that are related to the local microenvironment of the tumor. These changes in metabolism can potentially be exploited for both imaging and drug development. In addition, Dr. Quong has continued his work identifying markers that are indicators of toxicity and response to therapy.

In 2012-2013, the goal of Dr. Quong’s research is to determine new strategies for patient treatment that include radiation therapy. By measuring the protein and gene expression in tumors, his will use this information for choosing treatment and also monitoring the patients’ response to treatment both for effectiveness and adverse side effects.