Kimmel Cancer Center Founding Directors Portrait Unveiled

17
Apr


Dr. Richard G. Pestell, Martha Mayer Erlebacher, Dr. Carlo M. Croce, Dr. Richard L. Davidson

A portrait of Dr. Carlo Croce, the founding Director of the Jefferson Kimmel Cancer Center, painted by Philadelphia artist Martha Erlebacher, was unveiled on Tuesday, April 10, 2012, at 4:00 PM in the Bluemle Life Sciences Building.

Martha Mayer Erlebacher has been recognized as one of the leading representational figurative and still-life artists in America who has shown her work nationally and internationally. A number of books and periodicals feature her work, much of which “examines the deep metaphorical and social themes of contemporary culture through her painterly and aesthetic images.”

Dr. Croce is world-renowned for his contributions involving the genes and genetic mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of human cancer. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and Institute of Medicine in the United States and the Accademia Nazionale delle Scienze detta deiXL in Italy. He has earned a plethora of awards in recognition of his hard work and dedication including two Outstanding Investigator awards from the National Cancer Institute and most recently, an Elected Membership to The American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Dr. Joesph S. Gonnella and Dr. Carlo M. Croce

Dr. Croce is a principal investigator on eleven federal research grants and has more than 950 peer-reviewed, published research papers. A native of Milan, Italy, Dr. Croce earned his medical degree, summa cum laude, in 1969 from the School of Medicine, University of Rome. He began his career in the United States the following year as an associate scientist at the Wistar Institute of Biology and Anatomy in Philadelphia. In 1980, he was named Wistar Professor of Genetics at the University of Pennsylvania and Institute Professor and Associate Director of the Wistar Institute, titles he held until 1988. From 1988-91, he was Director of the Fels Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Biology at Temple University School of Medicine in Philadelphia.

In 1991 Dr. Croce was named Director of the Kimmel Cancer Institute at Thomas Jefferson University.  While here, Dr. Croce discovered the role of microRNAs in cancer pathogenesis and progression, implicating a new class of genes in cancer causation.  After thirteen years as Director of the Kimmel Cancer Center, Dr. Croce moved to Ohio State University in 2004.  Under his direction at OSU, faculty within the Human Cancer Genetics Program conduct both clinical and basic research.  Basic research projects focus on how genes are activated and inactivated, how cell-growth signals are transmitted and regulated within cells, and how cells interact with the immune system. Clinical research focuses on discovering genes linked to cancer and mutations that predispose people to cancer.