PCF Young Investigator Award Goes to Jefferson Researcher

22
Feb

Heather Montie, Ph.D., a post-doctoral research fellow in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, has received a Prostate Cancer Foundation Young Investigator Award for her work with androgen receptor (AR) acetylation and its role in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

Young Investigator awards are designed to promote long-term careers in the field of prostate cancer by providing three year grants for transformational research focused on prostate cancer treatments to improve patient outcomes. Since 2007, PCF has invested more than $20 million in Young Investigator grants.

“PCF-supported young investigators have changed the scope of prostate cancer research, advancing treatment sciences and improving the lives of patients worldwide,” said Howard Soule, PhD, chief science officer and executive vice president of PCF. “It is with great pride and appreciation that PCF can now announce our young investigator program spans across six countries and 42 research institutes.”

Prostate cancer is driven by the male hormones, androgens which mediate their activity through the androgen receptor. Unfortunately most prostate cancerous tumors progressively become resistant to the preferred treatment modality, androgen deprivation therapy. One of the mechanisms proposed to enhance the activity of androgen receptors in castration-resistant prostate cancer, even in the absence of androgens, is the addition of a small chemical group/moiety to the AR protein. This modification of AR is termed ‘acetylation’ and is proposed to convert the protein to a ‘super AR.’

However, there is currently no experimental data to show that AR acetylation directly enhances AR-dependent prostate cancer cell viability.

Dr. Montie proposes to evaluate the role of AR acetylation in the enhanced AR functional activity central to CRPC. She will study the precise mechanisms by which this modification of AR enhances its cancer-promoting activity. Dr. Montie will also validate the potential of AR acetylation as a therapeutic target for castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

A total of 15 competitive research grants have been awarded to-date in 2012, bringing the total of young investigators awarded to 89.

Each Young Investigator recipient is awarded $225,000 over a three-year period.

Dr. Montie received the 2012 John A. Moran PCF Young Investigator Award. 

Visit here for more on the Young Investigator awards.