Category Publications


The Perfect Match Might Be the Imperfect One

When it comes to treating blood cancers like leukemia and lymphomas, new research shows that a half-matched donor bone marrow transplant may be just as good as a full match, in the first apples to apples type comparison of its kind. (PHILADELPHIA) – Bone marrow transplantation is a life-saving therapy for many patients with blood …


Global Positioning at the Cancer Frontline

Dr. Pestell’s recent TEDx presentation “Is Good Health a Choice?” was featured in an “Australia Unlimited” article by David Varga. The article describes Dr. Pestell’s background and upbringing as well as highlighting his  innovative research involving the “GPS of Cancer” (the biological navigation system that allows malignant cancer cells to spread to the most vulnerable …


A Link between Hormones and DNA Repair Provide New Clues to Treat Advanced Prostate Cancer

For advanced prostate cancers, new strategies for therapeutic intervention are urgently needed, and require a better understanding of how tumor cells go from slow growth to aggressive behaviors that threaten patient lives. A new study, published by Thomas Jefferson University’s Kimmel Cancer Center researchers in the September 11th online edition of the journal Cancer Discovery, …


Researchers Find New Clues to Treat Rare and Aggressive Inflammatory Breast Cancer

A study led by investigators from Thomas Jefferson University’s Kimmel Cancer Center has discovered molecular clues that may help physicians therapeutically target inflammatory breast cancer (IBC), a highly aggressive form of breast cancer. Their study, reported in the June 21 online issue of Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, identified two molecules (ALK and FAK1) involved in the …


Protein in Blood Exerts Natural Anti-Cancer Protection

Researchers from Thomas Jefferson University’s Kimmel Cancer Center have discovered that decorin, a naturally occurring protein that circulates in the blood, acts as a potent inhibitor of tumor growth modulating the tumor microenvironment. The study, published June 24 online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (, suggests it may be possible to …


Researchers Discover Molecule That Drives Aggressive Breast Cancer

Recent studies by researchers at Thomas Jefferson University’s Kimmel Cancer Center have shown a gene known to coordinate initial development of the eye (EYA1) is a powerful breast tumor promoter in mice. The gene EYA1 was also shown to be overexpressed in a genetic breast cancer subtype called luminal B. The scientists found that excess …


Dr. Iozzo’s recent PNAS publication shows link between decorin to autophagy in endothelial cells

Dr. Renato Iozzo, MD, PHD, Professor of Pathology & Cell Biology, Biochemistry & Molecular Biology and Kimmel Cancer Center member, and his group recently published results in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS) which show decorin functions as a tumor suppressor/anti-angiogenesis factor, in part, by inducing the autophagy of endothelial cells. The …


Richard Pestell Named AAAS Fellow

Richard Pestell, M.D., Ph.D., FACP, Director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson (KCC), has been named a 2011 Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). As part of the Section on Medical Sciences, Dr. Pestell was elected as an AAAS Fellow for his distinguished contributions to cancer care as director …


Jefferson Researchers Unlock Key to Personalized Cancer Medicine Using Tumor Metabolism

Identifying gene mutations in cancer patients to predict clinical outcome has been the cornerstone of cancer research for nearly three decades, but now researchers at the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson have invented a new approach that instead links cancer cell metabolism with poor clinical outcome. This approach can now be applied to virtually any …


Radiation Oncology Announcements and Appointments

New faculty: Thomas Jefferson University welcomes two new, seasoned clinicians and researchers to its Department of Radiation Oncology: Nicole Simone, M.D., from the National Institutes of Health’s National Cancer Institute (NCI) and Bo Lu, M.D., Ph.D, from Vanderbilt University. Dr. Simone is a board-certified Radiation Oncologist who has treated mostly patients with breast and head …


“Longevity” Protein SIRT1 May Ward Off Precursor to Prostate Cancer

Researchers from the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson and two other institutions have discovered new evidence that suggests the “longevity” protein SIRT1, known for its life-spanning effects in different species, can inhibit the development of a known precursor to prostate cancer, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN). “Prostate cancer is one of the malignancies that has a …


Researchers Say Stress Fuels Cancer Growth, Provide Genetic Evidence That Antioxidants Can Help Treat It

Researchers from Jefferson’s Kimmel Cancer Center have genetic evidence suggesting the antioxidant drugs currently used to treat lung disease, malaria and even the common cold can also help prevent and treat cancers because they fight against mitochondrial oxidative stress—a culprit in driving tumor growth. For the first time, the researchers show that loss of the …


Dr. Leonard G. Gomella Studies the Effect of Dutasteride on the Risk of Prostate Cancer

Dr. Leonard G. Gomella and colleagues conducted a landmark international randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group multi-center clinical trial to determine whether dutasteride reduces the risk of incident prostate cancer, as detected on biopsy, among men who are at increased risk for the disease. Over the course of the 4-year study period, dutasteride reduced the risk of …


Prolactin Blocks Oncogene Associated with Poor Prognosis in Breast Cancer

Researchers from the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson have found a mechanism by which a hormone responsible for milk production blocks an oncogene that makes breast cancer more aggressive. Publishing in the journal Cancer Research, the researchers discovered that prolactin, a pituitary hormone that normally stimulates breast development and milk production, in fact reduces levels …


Stromal Biomarker Predicts Advanced Prostate Cancer

The same biomarker was previously identified as a prognostic factor for breast cancer The absence of a stromal protein called caveolin-1 appears to be a marker for advanced prostate cancer and metastasis, researchers from the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson and Harvard Medical School reported in Cell Cycle. There was an abundance of stromal caveolin-1 …


New Universal Breast Cancer Marker Predicts Recurrence

The marker appears to be widely applicable to all breast cancer patients, regardless of other established prognostic indicators Reporting online in the American Journal of Pathology, researchers from the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson have implicated the loss of a stromal protein called caveolin-1 as a major new prognostic factor in patients with breast cancer, …


Jefferson Scientists Discover a Key Protein Regulator of Inflammation and Cell Death

Reporting in the journal Nature, researchers led by Emad Alnemri, Ph.D., professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology in the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson, discovered a key protein component involved in inflammation. The protein, AIM2 (absent in melanoma 2), is involved in the detection and reaction to dangerous cytoplasmic DNA that is produced by infection …


Jefferson Scientists Uncover Role of Cancer Stem Cell Marker: Controlling Gene Expression Patterns

Scientists at Jefferson’s Kimmel Cancer Center in Philadelphia have made an extraordinary advance in the understanding of the function of a gene previously shown to be part of an 11-gene “signature” that can predict which tumors will be aggressive and likely to spread. The gene, USP22, encodes an enzyme that appears to be crucial for …