Category Cancer Cell Biology & Signaling


Dr. Andrew Aplin Receives New NIH/NCI R01 Grant Award

Congratulations to Dr. Andrew Aplin for receiving a federally award (National Institute of Health/National Cancer Institute) R01 grant for his project: Mutant BRAF-regulated transcription factors in melanoma progression.


SKCC Scientists Show That Cancer Cells Can Use Exosome Transfer To Pass On Agressive Traits

Until recently, researchers thought that cell division was the only way for an aggressive cancer cell to pass its traits along. New evidence is showing that cancers can become more dangerous by exporting aggressive traits to neighboring cells via exosomes. These small packages — bubbles — of membrane released into the extracellular environment hold pieces …


Dr. Andrew Aplin to Lead Basic Science of the Sidney KImmel Cancer Center

Congratulations to Andrew Aplin, PhD, for his appointment to lead Basic Science for the SKCC! Dr. Aplin has already distinguished himself as the leader of the Cancer Cell Biology and Signaling Program, and he will bring his energy and scientific expertise to all aspects of basic research here at the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center. Please …


Dr. Iozzo’s recent PNAS publication shows link between decorin to autophagy in endothelial cells

Dr. Renato Iozzo, MD, PHD, Professor of Pathology & Cell Biology, Biochemistry & Molecular Biology and Kimmel Cancer Center member, and his group recently published results in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS) which show decorin functions as a tumor suppressor/anti-angiogenesis factor, in part, by inducing the autophagy of endothelial cells. The …


Ovarian, Glioblastoma & Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Jefferson Researchers Present at AACR

Several researchers from Jefferson’s Kimmel Cancer Center presented abstracts at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2012 in Chicago. Some of those findings include: HuR and Ovarian Cancer Silencing HuR may be a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of ovarian cancer, according to an abstract presented at AACR by researchers from Thomas …


Biomarker Links Clinical Outcome with New Model of Lethal Tumor Metabolism

Researchers at the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson have demonstrated for the first time that the metabolic biomarker MCT4 directly links clinical outcomes with a new model of tumor metabolism that has patients “feeding” their cancer cells.  Their findings were published online March 15 in Cell Cycle. To validate the prognostic value of the biomarker, …


PCF Young Investigator Award Goes to Jefferson Researcher

Heather Montie, Ph.D., a post-doctoral research fellow in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, has received a Prostate Cancer Foundation Young Investigator Award for her work with androgen receptor (AR) acetylation and its role in castration-resistant prostate cancer. Young Investigator awards are designed to promote long-term careers in the field of prostate cancer by …


Drugs targeting chromosomal instability may fight a particular breast cancer subtype

Another layer in breast cancer genetics has been peeled back. A team of researchers at Jefferson’s Kimmel Cancer Center (KCC) led by Richard G. Pestell, M.D., PhD., FACP, Director of the KCC and Chair of the Department of Cancer Biology, have shown in a study published online Feb. 6 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation …


Richard Pestell Named AAAS Fellow

Richard Pestell, M.D., Ph.D., FACP, Director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson (KCC), has been named a 2011 Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). As part of the Section on Medical Sciences, Dr. Pestell was elected as an AAAS Fellow for his distinguished contributions to cancer care as director …


Loss of RB in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Associated with Favorable Clinical Outcome

Researchers at the Thomas Jefferson University Hospital and Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson have shown that loss of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene (RB) in triple negative breast cancer patients is associated with better clinical outcomes. This is a new marker to identify the subset of these patients who may respond positively to chemotherapy. Today, …


New “Achilles’ Heel” in Breast Cancer: Tumor Cell Mitochondria

Researchers at the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson have identified cancer cell mitochondria as the unsuspecting powerhouse and “Achilles’ heel” of tumor growth, opening up the door for new therapeutic targets in breast cancer and other tumor types. Reporting in the online Dec.1 issue of Cell Cycle, Michael P. Lisanti, M.D., Ph.D., Professor and Chair …


Dr. Iozzo’s Work Chosen as Editor’s Choice in Science

A recent Science Signaling article (Science Signaling) (Pubmed Abstract), co-Senior Authored by Dr. Renato Iozzo, entitled “Signaling by the Matrix Proteoglycan Decorin Controls Inflammation and Cancer Through PDCD4 and MicroRNA-21″, was selected in the November 21st issue of Science Magazine as the Editor’s Choice (more info) in the Cell Signalling Category. Dr. Renato Iozzo is …


Dr. Michael Lisanti’s Cancer Research Featured in New Scientist

New cancer research suggests that we have misunderstood the feeding habits of cancer for decades, wrongly believing that cancer cells produce the bulk of their energy by breaking down glucose in the absence of oxygen, known as the Warburg effect. Dr. Michael Lisanti of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson proposes that when a cell turns cancerous …


Blocking Receptor in Key Hormone Fires Up Enzyme to Kill Pancreatic Cancer Cells

Pancreatic cancer researchers at Thomas Jefferson University have shown, for the first time, that blocking a receptor of a key hormone in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) reduces cancer cell growth by activating the enzyme AMPK to inhibit fatty acid synthase, the ingredients to support cell division. With that, a new chemopreventive agent that inhibits the …


KCC Research: Cancer Cells Accelerate Aging & Inflammation in Body to Drive Tumor Growth

Researchers at the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson have shed new light on the longstanding conundrum about what makes a tumor grow—and how to make it stop.  Interestingly, cancer cells accelerate the aging of nearby connective tissue cells to cause inflammation, which ultimately provides “fuel” for the tumor to grow and even metastasize. This revealing …


Jefferson Researchers Unlock Key to Personalized Cancer Medicine Using Tumor Metabolism

Identifying gene mutations in cancer patients to predict clinical outcome has been the cornerstone of cancer research for nearly three decades, but now researchers at the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson have invented a new approach that instead links cancer cell metabolism with poor clinical outcome. This approach can now be applied to virtually any …


“Longevity” Protein SIRT1 May Ward Off Precursor to Prostate Cancer

Researchers from the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson and two other institutions have discovered new evidence that suggests the “longevity” protein SIRT1, known for its life-spanning effects in different species, can inhibit the development of a known precursor to prostate cancer, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN). “Prostate cancer is one of the malignancies that has a …


Researchers Say Stress Fuels Cancer Growth, Provide Genetic Evidence That Antioxidants Can Help Treat It

Researchers from Jefferson’s Kimmel Cancer Center have genetic evidence suggesting the antioxidant drugs currently used to treat lung disease, malaria and even the common cold can also help prevent and treat cancers because they fight against mitochondrial oxidative stress—a culprit in driving tumor growth. For the first time, the researchers show that loss of the …