Category Prostate Cancer

11
Mar

Proepithelin Encourages Cell Growth and Migration in Prostate Cancer

Researchers from Thomas Jefferson University have identified a protein that appears to play a significant role in the growth and migration of prostate cancer cells, especially androgen-independent prostate cancer cells. The study was published in the American Journal of Pathology. They also found that prostate cancer cells express more of the protein when compared to …

18
Jun

Blocking Signaling Protein Prevents Prostate Cancer Spread, Jefferson Scientists Find

Researchers at the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson in Philadelphia have shown that by blocking a signaling protein, they can prevent prostate cancer cells from metastatic dissemination. The work opens the door to future studies examining the protein as a target for therapies aimed at keeping prostate cancer at bay. In a series of experiments …

3
Jun

Monitoring Blood Flow Helps Improve Prostate Biopsies, Jefferson Researchers Report

Using a special ultrasound technique to spot areas of blood flow in the prostate gland may substantially reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies, according to a new study by urologists and radiologists at the Jefferson Prostate Diagnostic Center and the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson in Philadelphia. The researchers found that biopsies targeted to areas …

29
Feb

Blocking Growth Protein Kills Prostate Cancer Cells, Inhibits Tumor Growth, Jefferson Scientists Find

Researchers at Jefferson’s Kimmel Cancer Center in Philadelphia have shown that they can effectively kill prostate cancer cells in both the laboratory and in experimental animal models by blocking a signaling protein that is key to the cancer’s growth. The work proves that the protein, Stat5, is both vital to prostate cancer cell maintenance and …

3
Jan

Jefferson Scientists Find Cell Growth Protein Potential Drug Target for Treatment-Resistant Prostate Cancer

Scientists at Jefferson’s Kimmel Cancer Center in Philadelphia have found that a signaling protein that is key to prostate cancer cell growth is turned on in nearly all recurrent prostate cancers that are resistant to hormone therapy. If the findings hold up, the protein, called Stat5, may be a specific drug target against an extremely …

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